Tag Archives: IIHF

Russians still don’t get it: their unsportsmanlike behaviour deserves punishment, not alibis

Russian sports minister Vitalyi Mutjko agrees Team Russia shouldn’t have left the ice after losing to Canada in last month’s world championship finals before O Canada was played. Still, he maintains, if the organizers didn’t open the gate, his country’s players would have never done that.

This seems to be a bit at odds with the latest news coming from Moscow: Russian hockey federation plans to punish a few people for the incident. General manager Andrei Safronov and head coach Oleg Znarok seem to be the targets. That, at least, is what Arkadi Rotenberg is saying. His word carries some weight: he sits on the board of the Russian hockey federation, and he also serves as Dinamo Moscow president.

“Yes, people will face consequences,” Rotenberg says, “and the general manager and head coach were right there to make sure our players stayed to hear Canada’s anthem.”

Of course, considering that International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) President René Fasel is on the record as saying the Russian federation will face a punishment meted out by his organization, Rotenberg’s next words were not surprising: “It wasn’t planned for our players to insult Team Canada, and it wasn’t planned ahead, either.”

Nobody’s talking about planning. Everybody’s talking about lacking sportsmanship and behaviour worthy of a butcher’s dog, to use the local lingo in translation. Besides, Fasel stood there, in shock, watching Team Russia captain Ilya Kovalchuk order his teammates to leave as soon as they collected their medals and shook the Canadian players by the hand. Only very few Russian players, led by superstars Alexander Ovechkin and Evgeni Malkin, stayed, and Kovalchuk skated toward them and very forcefully insisted that they leave the ice before a live orchestra gathered to render the Canadian anthem.

There was no sign of either Safronov or Znarok, and it makes no difference, either: this was not Kovalchuk’s first international tournament, and he would be expected to know the rules.

Besides, ignorance is no excuse.

“Safronov and Znarok are aware of what they did wrong,” thus Rotenberg, “and I believe that this will never happen again.”

A nice change from sports minister Mytjko’s qualifier that, while wrong, Team Russia players were not to blame. If it weren’t for a gate opened by the organizers, they would have stayed. He simply echoed Russian hockey federation president Vladislav Tretiak’s assurances that it was the Czechs who were the guilty party. They could have kept his team on the ice if only they didn’t open the gate.

The only English-written newspaper published in Moscow, The Moscow Times, has come up with an interesting take. The paper described, tongue in cheek, what would happen if Canadian players left the ice before they heard Rossia Sviaschennaia Nasha Derzhava, formerly known as Soyuz Nerushimyi.

“The investigators find,” thus The Moscow Times spoof, “that Team Canada, by leaving the ice before hearing the Russian anthem, have committed a criminal act comparable to abuse of the national flag of Russia. If found guilty, they will have to install toilet seats in all of the KHL arenas all over Russia, as punishment.”

Fine and dandy as it goes.

But let’s cut to the chase: what punishment will Safronov and Znarok face? Any consequences for team captain Kovalchuk?

“First, we’ve got to see what the IIHF is going to do,” said Rotenberg. “We’ll make our decision based on that.”

In his land, they have an expression for this kind of behaviour. They call it alibism.

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Team Russia shows no sense of decency

This is called sportsmanship at its best.

After Team Canada won the world championship 2015 title in the O2 Arena in Prague, Czech Republic, Sunday, it took the vanquished team quite some time to skate over and accept their silver medals from International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) President René Fasel.

In fact, Fasel had to keep waving at the Russians for almost a minute to convince them to come over and collect what was deservedly theirs.

But that wouldn’t be the end of it.

What happened then was even more shocking. Not surprising: something like that had happened in other, similar situations, too. And it always involved Russian teams in one shape or another. But one would have expected that the Russians would have learnt their lesson by now and not stoop to this kind of scandalous behaviour yet again. When Team Russia captain Ilya Kovalchuk saw the IIHF dignitaries began distributing gold medals to the winners from Canada, he ordered his teammates to leave the ice. He waited by the door to the bench to see that the entire squad leaves.

To their credit, a small group that included Team Russia’s brightest stars, Alexander Ovechkin and Yevgeni Malkin, remained at the blue line. Kovalchuk kept ordering them to leave forthwith, while Ovechkin was gesticulating back that good manners dictate they should stay there till the end of the ceremony. Or, at least, until Team Canada captain Sidney Crosby receives the championship cup and O Canada had been played.

It took about a minute of embarrassing exchanges. But when the fireworks started and the confetti were fired, Kovalchuk skated over and personally forced the remaining Russian players to leave immediately.

That no Russian player stayed to see Crosby and his teammates skating around with the cup is one thing; that they didn’t wait until an orchestra gathered to play O Canada, is another.

Fasel said he was very disappointed with Team Russia’s behaviour. He said he found it perfectly unacceptable and added that the IIHF is going to debate potential punishment. Team Russia’s behaviour showed profound lack of respect for the other team, and Russian Hockey Federation will be asked for an explanation, Fasel told the Russian TASS news agency, adding Team Russia’s behaviour showed not only lack of sportsmanship, it also broke the IIHF’s rules, and for that, the Russian Hockey Federation can expect proper punishment.

Fasel said some Russian players wanted to be sportsmanlike: “We saw Ovechkin and Malkin who tried to stay. It’s the team management and coaching staff who should have made sure nothing like this happened; they were right there, on the ice, at the time.”

Vladislav Tretyak, the former all-world goalie who now serves as Russian Hockey Federation’s president, said it was all a misunderstanding rather than lack of respect: his players even shook Canadian players’ hands, he said.

But former Czech goalie Petr Bříza, who served on the organizing committee, said wherever Team Russia showed up, difficulties would follow.

When they came to Ostrava, instead of staying in a hotel reserved for all teams that played there, the Russians demanded that they be accommodated in Kravaře, an Ostrava suburb. Then, when they saw it took them longer than it took others to get to the ČEZ Arena, they demanded that the organizers provide them with police escort, so their team bus can get to and from the arena breaking all traffic rules.

In fact, Team Russia was scandalized its team bus had to wait at a railway crossing for a train to pass. Organizers in Ostrava started asking publicly whether they should have made the railway change its schedule, and Team Russia dropped the subject.

And, Bříza added, “They brought a few problems with them to Prague, too, issues that hadn’t been here before their arrival. The eight teams that had been here were living side by side quite famously, but then the Russians came and the first thing they did was they blocked off a hallway in the arena and demanded to stay in a different hotel. That created serious security issues for us, and if anything had happened, it would have been linked to the championship, no question. And then, they topped it off with such lack of sportsmanship and respect for others, including the entire event,” Bříza concluded.

It seems it may be useful for the organizers of the forthcoming World Cup (NHL and NHLPA) to remind Team Russia management in advance that there are basic rules of decency and sportsmanship that one should keep in mind even following bitter defeat.

And if they can’t live with it, disinvite them, no matter the star power that the event would lose.

Have Xenon inhalations led Russians to their Olympic medals?

When is it doping and when is it not?

Many Russian athletes quite openly inhaled Xenon gas during the Sochi Olympic Games, a German TV network reported, and they have got off scot-free.

And, the WDR added, it can prove Russian athletes have been using Xenon at least since the Olympic Games in Athens, Greece, in 2004. In fact, the WDR report says, documents created (allegedly) by Russian Ministries of sports and defence (in and of itself a couple of strange bedfellows) have been recommending the use of Xenon specifically to “enhance athletes’ performance.”

The fact that the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has ignored its use helped, too.

A bit of basic information: Xenon is a chemical element with the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. It is a colourless, heavy, odourless noble gas, that occurs in the Earth’s atmosphere in trace amounts. Although generally unreactive, xenon can undergo a few chemical reactions such as the formation of xenon hexafluoroplatinate, the first noble gas compound to be synthesized.

Naturally occurring xenon consists of eight stable isotopes. There are also over 40 unstable isotopes that undergo radioactive decay. The isotope ratios of xenon are an important tool for studying the early history of the Solar System. Radioactive xenon-135 is produced from iodine-135 as a result of nuclear fission, and it acts as the most significant neutron absorber in nuclear reactors.

Xenon is used in flash lamps and arc lamps, and as a general anesthetic.

Thus basic information from Google and Wikipedia. So far so good, right?

Except: xenon just happens to enhance the creation of the erythropoietin hormone in human bodies. Too much Latin? How does the abbreviation EPO strike you? Does the name Ben Johnson ring a bell?

As we have been reliably informed by WADA years ago, EPO is a no-no.

Except, Mario Thevis of the doping-control lab in Koln in Germany told WDR, their scientists couldn’t test for xenon because they don’t know how.

Ooops, right?

Of course, Thevis added, there have been scientific tests made on animals, to see how xenon impacted them.

Here’s a verbatim translation of a verbatim quote: “Within one day, 24 hours, that is, creation of EPO increased from 1.6 to 160 per cent. That is a significant increase.”

Would the result in people be similar? Quite possibly, Thevis said.

WADA President, Craig Reedie of Scotland, said his office is going to check this information. “Our commision that deals with the banned substances list, will look into this issue very soon. We will be debating the issue of gas inhalations at the very next post-Olympic meeting.”

What will WADA debate?

“We have to know for sure whether this is doping,” former WADA boss Dick Pound was quoted as saying. “We have to establish whether it would or would not be possible to say during a potential investigation that the rules are unclear on this.”

And his personal take?

“This method was developed exclusively to enhance performance. So far as I am concerned, that constitutes doping.”

Thus Dick Pound.

Another case of the anti-doping crowd playing catch-up.

Of course, these guys have been playing catch-up all along. Logical in most cases, terribly illogical in the case of Swedish hockey star Nicklas Bäckström.

Just about two hours before the opening faceoff in Team Sweden’s gold medal game against Team Canada, Bäckström was pulled off the roster: an anti-doping test found traces of pseudoephedrine in his urine. They had known about it for some two days, and it took the anti-doping crowd all that time to inform the Team Sweden management about their findings.

Here’s the basic scoop on the dope, ooops, medication (courtesy drugs.com): Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that shrinks blood vessels in the nasal passages. Dilated blood vessels can cause nasal congestion (stuffy nose).

Pseudoephedrine is used to treat nasal and sinus congestion, or congestion of the tubes that drain fluid from your inner ears, called the eustachian tubes.

Having read that, one can easily believe that all that Bäckström did was take a Sudafed or a Claritine or any of the usual over-the-counter medications to unstuff his nose.

Bäckström would not be the first hockey player to suffer severe allergies. One guy, in fact, had to quit hockey altogether, even though on the path to become a useful NHL player. His name is Jan Vopat. The combination of sweat and hockey gear caused swelling all over his body that wouldn’t go away for days on end.

Bäckström has been using the anti-allergic medication for years. His Team Sweden’s physician saw no issues with it. Bäckström had played in a number of international games for Team Sweden during that time, using the anti-allergic medication whenever he needed to be able to breathe, without any complaints or issues raised by anybody.

When the word came down from the mount, the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) asked the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to be sensible. So has the NHL. No use: when these guys dig their heels in, that marks the end of the story.

No wonder that the Swedes are now livid about the IOC.

“They ruined our fans’ greatest dream,” said Team Sweden’s GM Tommy Boustedt.

It’s not only the verdict itself but its timing, too, that makes him see red.

“This was crazy! I think it was a political decision. If we knew two days earlier, it wouldn’t have been that terrible, but they evidently wanted to make a bomb out of it.”

So far as Team Sweden’s management is concerned, the IOC’s stuffed shirts wanted to show how hard they fight doping. The future is going to be interesting: Team Sweden’s management is considering a lawsuit against the IOC. Not that anything would overturn the verdict on ice, the Swedes themselves said Team Canada was too good on that particular day, but they want to teach the IOC a lesson.

Former Team Sweden star Ulf Nilsson told aftonbladet.se: “Yes, one has to accept responsibility for what one is doing, but I don’t think you’re using this medication as doping. It would be funny to see the IOC’s stupidity if it wasn’t that tragic.”

Nilsson knows whereof he speaketh: he was found guilty of using ephedrin durting the 1974 world championships in Helsinki. All that because he used an over-the-counter cough sirup.

Not all is black or white, said a former Swedish high jumper, himself an Olympic winner in 2004, Stefan Holm: “We couldn’t let Bäckström play until all the results were in. We got them Sunday afternoon. Yes,” he conceded, “that did take too long, and we have to find out why, but it’s a tough job.”

Funny how quickly he turned from an athlete to a stuffed shirt of a bureaucrat.

If anyone has ever seen hockey players coming to their arenas before their games, most of them are clutching coffee mugs, sipping frantically. An informal statistic: most players consume anywhere between a half of a dozen to a full dozen cups of coffee every day.

Talk about stimulation!

Another proof the Olympic Games is as hypocritical as any event can get. Shameless, to boot. And it keeps getting away with it.

Beer and shots: Sergei Varlamov’s deadly combination

If only half of what Colorado Avalanche goaltender Sergei Varlamov’s girlfriend (one assumes she’s now his former girlfriend, but who knows) had to say is true, the guy should land behind bars for the six years that the U.S. law allows.

Evgeniya Vavrinyuk spoke to the Denver Post newspaper. A video recording of her story (you can watch it here: http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_24436856/translation-media-interview-given-by-semyon-varlamovs-girlfriend), with translation from Russian to English, appeared on the newspaper’s site the other day.

Vavrinyuk told the paper her version of what happened on that night that ended with Varlamov arrested on domestic violence charge, spending one night in a police cell, only to be released the next day on a $5,000 bail.

It’s not too pretty.

In fact, it’s perfectly ugly.

According to Vavrinyuk, Sergei Varlamov got drunk beyond description, whereupon he proceeded to assault her physically, causing her what is known in police jargon and legal circles as bodily harm. It was not the very first time he would do so, Vavrinyuk told the Denver Post. When it happened in Russia during the lockout, she would report the incident to local police at Yaroslavl but nothing would happen: Sergei Varlamov was (still is), after all, a famous hockey player, a celebrity. Vavrinyuk’s complaint was ignored.

She found that matters were somewhat different in North America: women have their rights and authorities have no difficulty with defending them, no matter whatever social status enjoyed by the perpetrator.

In fact, what happened in Mother Russia once the report of Varlamov’s arrest in Denver was made public there confirmed the well-known generalizations about Russians, especially their males, and sports fans in particular. Vavrinyuk received numerous personal threats, her family members were harassed, too, and she fears that a return home would cause her even more grief than what Varlamov had inflicted upon her.

Vavrinyuk told the Denver Post she is not (and never has been) after Varlamov’s money. After all, she worked as a model in Hong Kong and earned enough to sustain herself. She broke her deal in Hong Kong about a year ago because Varlamov insisted that she join him in Denver.

Whether she is or is not after his money is perfectly irrelevant at the moment, but her statement isn’t. If it happens that the whole thing comes to trial and she changes her mind, Varlamov’s lawyers would, perfectly logically, confront her with her statement made in the Denver Post interview. That might carry the day so far as this part of the matter is concerned. Then again, it might not, but it would quite ridiculously complicate the affair.

This is not to say that each and every Russian guy there is drinks too much for his own good and can’t hold his booze too well, to boot. This is not to say, either, that each and every Russian guy is a bully and a dirty male chauvinist pig. There must be (and, one hopes, there are) exceptions. But the legend is too convincing. And, by the way, so are this author’s personal experiences from Russia and with the Russians.

The Avalanche are, of course, perfectly correct when they wouldn’t hesitate to start Varlamov in their nets. Unless and until he’s legally convicted, he’s as innocent as freshly fallen snow. If his goaltending form remains where it’s been the last few weeks, good for the team. Besides, a professional sports team doesn’t exist to judge anybody’s personal character. A professional sports team is here to win and, by extension, make its owners some spending cash.

The picture would change altogether if the paying public turned against Varlamov and, by extension, against the Avalanche paying the goalie and casting a blind eye on his alleged (still alleged, not proven, at this time) shenanigans. Were that to happen, the club might end up running away from the black eye a.k.a. Sergei Varlamov, going faster than speed of light.

If, by the way, the latter were to happen and Varlamov were to be found innocent in court, after all, even if it were to be on a technicality, he would be able to mulct the club in heavy damages. That’s something Avalanche’s lawyers must have taken into consideration, too.

In any case, the Avalanche must have got used to such kind of spotlight by now: its coach, Patrick Roy, was in a similar predicament some time ago when, still the club’s goalie, he got into trouble over domestic violence, too.

But that’s neither here nor there.

Quite a few people keep asking: well, if Sergei Varlamov was such a bully and girlfriend-beater, why did Evgeniya Vavrinyuk stay with him so long? They knew each other for four years, after all, and were partners for about a year.

Any psychologist worth her or his salt knows the answer. There are people (mostly women) whom the psychologists consider to be worthy of the title of Good Samaritans. Why it is mostly women, nobody knows for sure; some say it’s the good old maternal instincts, other just satisfy themselves with knowing that that’s how it is. In any case, it is mostly women who accept hard-drinking, abusive men, saying to themselves it must have been his former girlfriend or wife or parents, or whoever else, who had made him do it, but now that he’s met me, he’s going to change, I’ll teach him to mend his ways, and so on, fill in whatever other such and similar shortsighted and stupid expressions you can think of.

It’s the same with that good, old (and stupid) pick-up phrase: You know, you’re so different, my wife, she just doesn’t understand me – the percentage of women who end up spending years with psychologists trying to help them get out of the breakups is simply shocking.

This, in any case, would go a long way to explain Evgeniya Vavrinyuk’s behaviour.

And what if Sergei Varlamov sees the writing on the wall after his lawyer has whispered in his ear it seems he’s going to get at least four years behind bars, if not the maximum six years? What if he goes for it, leaves the courtroom before the judge returned with her or his sentence, makes straight for the Denver International Airport, and next thing we know he’s back in Yaroslavl, telling the club there they need a good goalie?

Modern electronic communications are faster than the fastest airplane. Before he landed in Russia, a note would have been sent from the Denver court to whatever authorities, the NHL head office being one of them. A copy of the note would make its way to the International Ice Hockey Federation’s head office in Zurich, Switzerland, whence they would go with that same speed to Moscow: Sergei Varlamov is a fugitive and, as such, he’s not allowed to be employed by any hockey club within the IIHF jurisdiction. Certainly, the KHL would say it’s not bound by any such nonsense issued by those guys in Switzerland. But the Russian hockey federation that is an IIHF member would be bound by IIHF’s refusal to issue a transfer card for Varlamov. As a result, Varlamov would be also banned from coming close to the Team Russia training camp before the Sochi Olympics in February 2014.

This, of course, would confirm what several high-ranking Russian hockey people had been saying all along: the Varlamov case is a plot, a conspiracy, to deny Mother Russia the services of its best goaltender in an attempt to make sure Mother Russia doesn’t win the gold medal it so richly deserves at the Sochi Olympics.

Crazy? Not one bit. The country’s president, Vladimir Putin, is a former high-ranking KGB (Soviet-era state security and espionage service) officer, and many of those now serving within all kinds of Russian organizations, have been serving the KGB in one major capacity or another, too. And if anybody knows a thing or two about plots and conspiracies, it would be the good old KGB.

We’re getting into the high-wire balancing act of international politics here. And all that because one goalie drinks too much, can’t hold his liqueur, and ends up beating up his girlfriend.

And a brief note as an observation for those not fluent in the Russian language: the translation below the video, while not a literary gem and/or proof of the actual interpreter’s abilities, is correct and doesn’t miss anything.

NHL, NHLPA to face the world hand in hand

This is bartering at its best: we gave you the Olympics, and now, we expect goods of same or better value in return.

Here it is: the NHL and its union, the NHLPA, are huddled in New York this week. They are preparing their joint talking points for continuing negotiations with the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF).

The World Cup of Hockey, one of the major topics of discussion, is a given. Expect it to happen in 2016.

Except, nothing is as simple as it looks. For example: the IIHF seems to be of the view that early fall, preferably pre-season early fall (or late summer, preferably pre-season late summer) would be the best time to stage the World Cup. Yet, there happens to be a North American school of thought that would rather see the event take place midway through the season. Here’s the logic: we are interrupting our league’s proceedings in February 2014, just as the battles for the Stanley Cup playoffs begin to heat up. It costs us money (and it cost league programmers a few grey hairs, too, to compress an 82-game schedule so as not to lose a single game and still make sure playoffs begin in April). And we’ve done all that just to send our stars to somewhere in the middle of nowhere in Russia. That’s an aggravation for us more than anything, and it’s costing us money. Having the World Cup midway through the season would help us recoup those losses and then some.

The Olympic Games are the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) cash cow. That august body splits its income with international associations (such as the IIHF), and they, in turn, share it with national federations that are their backbone. The NHL is not an international association. It’s not a national federation, either. It can hardly expect Hockey Canada or USA Hockey to go insane all of a sudden and share their shares with the NHL. When the NHL sees just the broadcasting contracts the IOC has managed to impose all over the world (and never mind the tactics used to achieve that), the league must be going bonkers: all that money, and none of it comes our way! We give them our stars’ prestige, and what do we get in return? Feel free to fill in whichever four-letter word comes to mind here.

In any case, no wonder the NHL and the NHLPA would prefer to have the World Cup staged midway through the season: it might maximize their income more than considerably.

There are at least two options to be debated about how to split the World Cup income. One plan lets the NHL and NHLPA keep their (major) share and let the IIHF divide the rest, whether it be among all of its national federations or only those that sent teams to the event. The other plan would see the NHL and NHLPA keep their (major) share and split the rest among the federations that sent teams to the event, with the calculation based on how far this or that particular team had made it. This option would leave IIHF out of the equation completely, something the NHL and the NHLPA would have no issues with. The other side would not be too enthusiastic about it.

Before even beginning to debate the issue of money, the IIHF cries in response: but we’ve got a world championship in May!

Oh yeah? comes a cynical reply. How about NOT having it during the years the World Cup of Hockey is on? The existing proposals mention either every two years or, and that is more probable, every four years: two years after and two years before Olympic Games.

Here’s the rub: world championship happens to be the IIHF’s cash cow. It doesn’t have to share the loot with anybody but its national federations. Not a cent goes IOC’s way. Again: the NHL is NOT a national federation.

The NHL is not altogether pleased with this arrangement, either. It’s of the view that allowing its players to take part in the world championship helps enhance the event’s credibility. Enhanced credibility equals increased income. Yes, the players who go to take part in the world championship belong to clubs that didn’t make the playoffs or were eliminated in the first round, preferably in four games. Still, they are NHL players, and some of them are genuine stars. What’s in it for us, argue the NHL and the NHLPA, but risks? If a star player gets injured, fine, he gets money from his insurance, but what if he’s not available to his NHL team for a few months next season? Stars bring butts into arena seats. A star’s absence costs the NHL (and, by extension, the NHLPA) money. Well?

Besides, as an aside, the NHL and NHLPA are not at all satisfied with the fact that insurance coverage and sundry matters related to it differ considerably from national federation to national federation. They would like to see something that holds valid for everybody concerned.

There’s another proposal making rounds for these talks. It’s dear to the IIHF, while the NHL and the NHLPA are not so sure. Not yet, at least. It’s the idea to copy the beautiful game (association football, soccer for the uninitiated) and put together something to be known as Champions Cup. Its version on the pitch attract incredible crowds (and broadcast audiences, on television, radio and, these days, in new media). That’s a lot of money.

Why not go for it, full speed ahead? Again, there are numerous issues about competences, responsibilities and shares, and then, there’s one overwhelming fear: what if the Stanley Cup champion loses a game to, say, Lithuania? What’s the public going to say? How will it play in Peoria? as the cliché goes.

The NHL (with NHLPA’s approval, it seems) has already told the IIHF not to even bother dreaming about the league’s participation in the 2018 Olympic Games in South Korea. Let’s have the World Cup, instead, the two groups say. Having the Olympic Games in South Korea does nothing to enhance the worldwide appeal of hockey, they seem to be saying, but having the World Cup in markets that cherish the game, now, that changes our views on international cooperation beyond belief.

Speaking of markets, the NHL (and the NHLPA) is not too sure that staging season-openers overseas (in Europe or in Japan) is the way to go. Financial returns have been far below overwhelming, and the players are not too happy about coming back and plunging, heads first, into the season without much time to adjust to the jet lag of at least six hours.

It’s going to be a long, complicated and difficult path before the NHL and the NHLPA reach a binding agreement with the IIHF. The interesting thing at the moment is that the league and its union are writing a joint songbook so they can sing in unison. The other interesting (and as important) thing is that neither side has mentioned it’s all about sports. There might be an occasional expression of trust that this or that helps enhance the game and spread its popularity, but it’s always quickly linked to revenues that this or that might bring in.

Well, at least they are sincere about it.

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