Generic drug maker killed four years ago, tracks remain cold. Or do they?

Nobody, it seems, would touch this double murder with a ten-foot pole. Not even the popular and long-running American television let’s-pretend docudrama series, CSI (meaning: crime scene investigation).

This double homicide some writers call most mysterious in Canadian history has obviously not been interesting enough for television.

In any case, as Dr. Watson would tell Sherlock Holmes, herewith materia facti: Barry Sherman was murdered, together with his wife Honey, on Wednesday, December 13, 2017, with just 18 days remaining till next year.

It’s not known whether the police, both south and north of the 49th parallel, have filed the entire matter away or not. They claim not. All that’s known is this: they may be trying to dig around like busy moles even as this is being written, or they may have given up.

Seeing that the victims were involved in development, manufacture and sales that some of the so-called Big Pharma companies viewed askance, and that the victims’ history was linked to Canada’s current Prime Minister, the latter scenario seems to acquire more probability than the former.

The murder was brutal, even by seasoned police officers’ accounts. And yet, it still remains unsolved.

Here’s the intrigue

Barry Sherman was the proud owner of Apotex, the largest maker of generic drugs in Canada.

Big Pharma companies loved (still do) the generic drug manufacturers like the proverbial thorns in their sides, and Apotex was no exception.

In fact, Apotex was a thorn’s thorn to them: it has been known as the only maker of Hydroxychloroquine, one of the potentially efficient and cost-effective antidotes to complaints caused by the Covid-19 group of viruses.

Here comes the question that Sherlock Holmes and others would have difficulty solving: how much did the Bog Pharma know in 2017 about coronaviruses generally, and Covid-19 in particular?

Apotex has remained out of the spotlight until very recently. Midway through this October, the company paid almost $100 million to the U.S. government and the state of Texas. American authorities had been alleging that Apotex conspired with other competitors to hike prices of popular drugs.

Texas isn’t alone: 49 other states are pushing their cases against Apotex and other firms. They claim that these drug makers have engaged in a widespread pattern of price fixing.

“Apotex admitted to a conspiracy to suppress and eliminate competition,” the U.S. Justice Department stated. That prevented a criminal conviction that would have most likely barred it from the American market,

According to Bloomberg News, Apotex is now exploring a sale of the company. The buyer would have to dish out an amount in the billions of dollars.

Apotex as a company, and Barry Sherman as its owner, had been in hot water before, too. Then-Canada’s Commissioner of Lobbying, Karen Shepard, subpoenaed two Apotex executives. That would force them to speak to her office’s investigators under oath, and Sherman did all he could to block it.

This matter became a politically sensitive issue: a few days before his unhappy demise, Sherman tried to quash an official investigation into a political fundraiser that he held for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

The fundraiser allegedly contravened Canadian lobbying rules.

This was not the first time Sherman had attracted the Canadian Lobbying Commissioner’s attention: a year before his death her office started another probe, again, related to Trudeau and a fundraiser hosted by Sherman.

He faced a possible five-year ban from lobbying. His untimely departure prevented the probe from continuing.

Experts who have been trying to figure out what happened on that fateful Wednesday, December 13, 2017, are still unsure of what to say.

Still hot?

According to a recent CBC News report, Toronto police’s highest-ranking officials have said they have a number of people whom they consider persons of interest and they insist that the case hasn’t gone cold.

“The investigative team has had a high level of co-operation throughout this very active and ongoing investigation and investigative steps are being taken every single day,” Toronto Police spokesperson Connie Osborne told Canada’s public broadcaster. “We are committed to bringing closure and justice to the family and the community.”

A number of people apparently still have issues. Such as: has Apotex and Sherman’s behaviour tainted Justin Trudeau’s reputation?

Not that Canada’s Prime Minister would care much, based on his recent actions.

According to the murdered couple’s son, Jonathon, his parents had some powerful enemies. Who were they? Did they include any of the Big Pharma companies whose profits Apotex threatened outright?

How is the deal between Apotex and U.S. authorities linked to the entire affair? What is it? Is it a payoff to an organised crime group, or a deserved punishment for breaking the law?

What impact will the potential sale of the company have on future police investigations, if there are any, that is?

The news from south of the 49th seems to have re-opened the Pandora Box instead of closing it for ever.

One thought on “Generic drug maker killed four years ago, tracks remain cold. Or do they?

  1. Greg Kennedy November 30, 2021 at 19:54 Reply

    Blame it on the “Pharma Bro”!!!

    On Tue., Nov. 30, 2021, 7:51 p.m. Questions, questions, questions …, wrote:

    > Peter Adler posted: ” Nobody, it seems, would touch this double murder > with a ten-foot pole. Not even the popular and long-running American > television let’s-pretend docudrama series, CSI (meaning: crime scene > investigation). This double homicide some writers call most myst” >

    Like

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