Are we there yet? Depends on whom you ask

Is the pandemic over or will it continue into the unforeseeable future?

The reply has nothing to do with reality. The reality depends on where people who reply stand in the political spectrum.

The question itself is misleading and irrelevant: there was and is no pandemic. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has stripped itself of any tools to measure any spread of any disease a dozen years ago. As an official European Union (EU) probe would establish, this change would help WHO’s medical advisors to lucrative offers from pharmaceutical companies that were trying to develop an answer to flu viruses at the time. Remember swine flu? Bird flu? SARS? H1N1? Yes, those.

A virus has become a political shrapnel, instead of a seasonally regular occurrence of an outbreak of a respiratory condition.

Opinion polls, no matter how solemnly published, and no matter the attention-grabbing fanfare, have been a perfectly useless tool, with the exception of pseudo-science known as political marketing. Their results depend on who’s paying the piper.

Who thinks what

With this warning out of the way, here’s a piece of news: the more conservative part of general population are of the view that the worst events of the Covid pandemic have passed. The people who are closer to the left-wing of politics are convinced that the virus is here to stay.

So far as they are concerned, we can look forward to a perpetual anxiety disorder affecting the entire population.

That’s known as Gallup’s re-discovery of America.

Generally, the people who are more realistic, that is, those who do not espouse wild dreams about humans ordering nature around, are also more optimistic.

This, by the way, is one of the major flaws of public opinion polls, no matter who conducts them, and no matter who pays for them: they generalise.

But still: comparing 57 per cent of Republicans to a mere four per cent of Democrats so far as the belief that the pandemic is over goes, is ludicrous. After all, the four-per-cent figure equals the accepted (and acceptable) error margin in such polls. That makes the Democrats’ number statistically insignificant (and meaningless).

Plain observation, minus calculators, shows that many young, healthy people still wear masks when they go out for a walk on a beautiful day or when they are perfectly alone behind the steering wheel.

If they suffer from autoimmune issues, this could be the only acceptable explanation for them.

Either that, or they are plain stupid.

Of course, and not so shockingly, there now exist quite a few jurisdictions (including entire countries) that can hardly care less about the so-called virus protocols.

Not that they didn’t care at the outset, but as soon as case numbers dropped, they saw no need to continue bothering their citizens. One can find quite a few high-ranking officials in those jurisdictions who would admit, for the background and on condition of full anonymity, that they had gone with the protocols out of that typical CYA desire (cover your behind, or, among the more educated, to establish an alibi).

Except, and that’s not a novel idea at all, those who prefer nanny states, these people hate the idea that the pandemic would go away, and with it their extraordinary powers that let them order people around and bully everybody who doesn’t toe the line.

Here’s the main issue: way too many people followed. Out of sheer fear.

So what if entire industries went to hell? So what if their children were all of a sudden forced to learn electronically, meaning they learnt nothing, if anything? And, most of all, so what if their children inherited the teachings of a criminal ideology because there was none other offered?

Adolf Hitler’s second in command, Hermann Wilhelm Göring, told the post-war Nuremberg tribunal that the key to making the German people a flock of sheep was very simple. Fear, he said. Scare them out of their wits, and they’ll do whatever you tell them. This, he added, works perfectly in any regime, from Nazism, monarchy, communism, any form of socialism, all the way to democracy.

Recent events confirmed Göring knew whereof he spoke.

How frightfully unexpected

The Gallup poll findings may sound surprising to some, but, in fact, they are not.

The general population has been massaged with numbers that the mainstream media never bothered to double-check, never mind put in any context and compare to figures covering similar situations in years past, both recent and more distant.

In addition, mainstream media suffer a major case of memory loss. If they didn’t, they would have been aware that the entire pandemic was a hoax from day one. They would have known that this was not the first attempt in recent years to change the course of history and human development.

The most intriguing part, as with most public opinion polls: neither Gallup, nor anybody else, would say who had paid the piper. What we get in the news are the results. It’s our choice to believe them or not. Nobody but Gallup knows the method they used to select their respondents. Nobody but Gallup knows such minor details of major importance as at what time of day (and what day of week) they asked their questions, and how precisely they phrased them (the questions in the Gallup news release are way too general).

Even if nobody ordered the poll from Gallup, the organisation knows perfectly well who their potential customers are, that is, who would be willing to pay, and for what. They are not doing it for anybody’s blue eyes. So, announcing who asked for a poll and/or who paid for it is paramount. It is more important, even, than the results themselves.

Did you notice any such announcement in the Gallup report?

A rhetorical question if there ever was one.

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